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York College

Here you will a find a full guide to Harvard referencing and tools to make your referencing easier.

Introduction to Harvard referencing

This guide will provide an explanation as to how to correctly reference other people's material for your own work.

Information on this page is for anyone required to reference as part of their course, yet uncertain how to reference, or which system to use. If your course is validated by an organisation, or your tutor has recommended that you follow a particular referencing system, please continue to do so.

Harvard referencing is the most common referencing system in use and originated at Harvard University. 

Over the years, Harvard referencing has been adapted by institutions, resulting in several variations of the original. It is therefore important when using Harvard that you use the same set of instructions throughout, instead of dipping into other variations of Harvard, thinking that they are all the same.

Please note that Harvard referencing is the recommended referencing system to use, but not the only one available. If your work requires adding footnotes, Oxford referencing may be more suitable. If so, please ask for guidance from your tutor, or Anne Cassidy (LC3), or Moira Potter (LC1, Wed-Frid).

Referencing Buzz words to explore in referencing instructions: quotations, paraphrasing, plagiarism, secondary referencing, contents page, reference list, bibliography, appendices …

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How to correctly cite and reference other people’s work in academic writing

It is important that you acknowledge when you are using the words or ideas of another person. This is critical as failure to do so is academic misconduct, otherwise known as plagiarism or cheating, which could lead to being excluded from College. Referencing not only protects against plagiarism, but is a requirement in academic writing and contributes to the overall marks. It demonstrates to the people marking your work that you used sources other than yourself, and that you are willing to admit this in your academic work. It gives credit to you for your research and also to the author of the work being borrowed.

Harvard referencing instructions explain how to acknowledge another person’s work by briefly citing within the text the surname of the author, and year of the resource, e.g. (Wilson, 2017) or Wilson (2016, p.3). St John’s Harvard varies on this and omits the comma e.g. (Wilson 2017). The reference list/bibliography is arranged alphabetically by surname, and follows the text, providing more details about the resource being used. Ideally when citing, it is best to also add the entry to the reference list.

Getting to grips with referencing is fairly simple, once you have used a few examples it should come naturally, and it is the best way to make sure you acknowledge that some words are not an original idea.

The following recommended websites and LC area provide comprehensive instructions on Harvard Referencing, which should answer any further questions you might have.

If you need further direction please ask your tutor, or Anne Cassidy (LC3) on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Moira Potter (LC1, Wed. – Fri) on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Referencing Resources

York St John University

Pdf: https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/media/content-assets/ils/documents/Harvard.pdf

Booklet: https://issuu.com/ysjils/docs/harvard

University of York

Referencing Homepage: https://www.york.ac.uk/students/studying/develop-your-skills/study-skills/study/integrity/referencing-styles/harvard/

Commonly used  University of York resources: https://www.york.ac.uk/students/studying/develop-your-skills/study-skills/study/integrity/referencing-styles/harvard/common-harvard/

Further examples: https://www.york.ac.uk/students/studying/develop-your-skills/study-skills/study/integrity/referencing-styles/harvard/further/

Learning Centre (LC3)

Cite them right: the essential referencing guide by R. Pears and G. Shields is an excellent starting point. Various editions (e.g. 8th, 9th and 10th) available on LC3 at 808.02 PEA. Use the same edition throughout.

Contact

If you need further direction please ask your tutor, or Anne Cassidy (LC3) on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Moira Potter (LC1, Wed. – Fri) on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..